Key Speaker of Influence

I have a list of people I really want to have as guests on my show and Daniel Priestley has been up amongst the top names on that list for some time, so you can imagine how happy I was when he agreed to be a guest on my show. It’s proof that sometimes just asking will actually get you a great result.

I first met Daniel years ago when he was running Triumphant Events and have followed him online ever since. His incredible books like ‘Key Person of Influence’, ‘Oversubscribed’, ‘Entrepreneur Revolution’ and ’24 Assets’ are all great reads and for me personally, ‘Key person of influence’ has been inspirational and incredibly useful in laying out Daniel’s 5-step process to becoming a notable person in any industry.

In this chat, I got the opportunity to ask Daniel about his entrepreneurial journey, his first steps into public speaking & presentation work as well as an answer to a question I had about his ‘Key Person of Influence’ book that has been bugging me for a few years now, as I thought I was either missing something or it wasn’t really there… You’re going to have to listen to find out…

If you want to become a Key Person of Influence if you want to make a dent in the universe, visit Dent Global to find out more.
You can also find Daniel on Facebook, Twitter and Linked In under his name.

To learn more about Presenting with Influence and becoming a key speaker of influence, visit my site Present Influence. If you want to get in touch with me about being a guest or recommending a guest from your network, or you’d like to be a sponsor for the show, please email john@presentinfluence.com or find me on Linked In.

Remember to subscribe to the show and if you’re listening through Apple Podcasts, please leave us a review. See you next time.

Transcript

John Ball  
Welcome to the speaking of influence podcast with virtual business speaker presentation skills and influence Coach John Ball. Remember to like and subscribe. The speaking of influence podcast is uploaded and distributed using Buzzsprout. Buzzsprout makes it really easy to get your podcast started and out to a wide audience with lots of tips and useful tools to help you on your way. If you’re interested, check the link in the show notes and start your podcast today. 

Welcome to the show. I’m really excited to have with me a guest I’ve been looking forward to speaking with for a long time now. He is multiple, having multiple books author, and also the co-founder of Dent Global. He’s written books like Key Person of Influence, Over-subscribed and 24 Assets and I’m sure there’s more stuff in the way as well, but I know I’ve read many of his books many times over. So I’m really happy today to introduce Daniel Priestley.

Daniel Priestley  
Thanks for having me on the show.

John Ball  
I’m so happy you agreed to come on, you are one of those people who is on my dream list of guests that I’d like to get on. So when you agreed I was really pleased.

Daniel Priestley  
Let’s hope I live up to it.

John Ball  
No pressure, no pressure at all. Daniel, for people who may not have come across you and what you do before, I encountered you quite a while back. But I think that was maybe before Dent Global, so explain a bit about what it is you do and your business for the audience.

Daniel Priestley  
So my main business is dent global, we run a business accelerator for entrepreneurs, fast-growth companies. We operate in the Asia Pacific region in the Ymir region, and also in America. So we actually have a major office in Sydney, London and Toronto. And we work with about 3000 fast-growth companies globally, put them through an acceleration programme. Part of it is about discovering their value. Part of it’s about becoming a key person of influence. Part of it is about creating scalability. So that is that’s the main thing that I do. We have an amazing team of about 50 to 60 people. We’ve got our own in house video production business, our own in house book publishing company. And it services company so so we’ve got a lot of in house capability that supports the accelerator programmes. And yeah, we launched in 2010. And we’ve had some of the world’s most amazing and successful and celebrated entrepreneurs who actually teach the programme. So most of our entrepreneurs who are on the programme are learning from people who have built result companies who have been best selling authors, you know, people who have hired hundreds of people. So they’re learning from really fascinating and interesting practitioners of entrepreneurship as well.

John Ball  
Great. So other than your own books, you’re publishing other entrepreneurs as well. 

Daniel Priestley  
So at the moment, we published about 400 books. 

John Ball  
Wow! Yeah, that’s fantastic. So I think when I first encountered you was some maybe in some of your early days in the UK? I’m not sure quite when you moved over to the UK. But we met I don’t expect you to remember. But we met a couple of times at some triumphant events gigs in in London back in those days. Yeah, yeah. So is it quite a long time ago, but it got me familiar with who you are, who you were, and we got connected up on social media. So I’ve been following you like you’re pretty active on social media, and you post a lot of good stuff. I interact with you on Twitter sometimes. And so is always good to see someone who’s like really, not just doing the business, but sharing stuff and asking questions and interacting.

Daniel Priestley  
Twitter today gave me the notification that yesterday that I signed up 13 years ago. Quite literally a third of my life. I’ve been compulsively tweeting. So yeah, kind of weird how 13 years later, bang.

John Ball  
Yeah, I’ve gone from someone who almost used to be exclusively just on Facebook to almost exclusively Twitter and LinkedIn,

Daniel Priestley  
You’ll be on tik tok. Next, I can, I can see what’s happening. Now I can see that.

John Ball  
I’m not very coordinated when it comes to dancing. And I think you have to do dance routines and work on it

Daniel Priestley  
You have time to work on this.

John Ball  
I want to come back to one of the things that I’m most as most impressed me and inspired me from something that you’ve done, which is your book key person of influence. And it’s one of those books that sometimes you come across a book, for me anyway, where you read it, or listen to it because I like audiobooks, and then you have straightway had to listen to it again, which is exactly what I did. And multiple times since then. And for me is it really was an inspiration about really understanding how to get known in any industry how to really sort of start to stand out. What inspired that book for you.

Daniel Priestley  
Well, you So in the 2000s, so I launched my first company, which was called Triumphant Events in 2002. And we were up and down the East Coast of Australia. We were touring speakers, we were doing what’s called roadshow marketing. roadshow marketing is essentially event marketing. You put the CEO of a company on stage and you roadshow them up and down the country. And they might be launching a product, or they might be talking to existing clients about something new, you know, they might be doing fundraising, we actually launched very successfully a massive national franchise through a roadshow. So I had a speciality in roadshow marketing, with triumphant events. And that company grew very big, very fast, it went from zero to 10 million of revenue, before I was 25. So it was pretty, pretty insane. One of the tactics for filling rooms was that we used to hire professional speakers who had a bit of a following. And we knew that if we put them on the stage that wow, the audience and give a really great experience. So if you’re putting a boring CEO who’s not very good at speaking, on a stage, you kind of want to have them, you want to have something else on the stage that day as well, that’s kind of makes it worth being at the event. So we used to hire a lot of this kind of professional speakers, best selling authors, TV personalities, sports, sporting legends, or ex sporting legends, all of those kinds of people would take the stage, our events, and I got a great opportunity to spend a lot of time with these people and to see the way their lives run and see the way they work and see what kind of profits they’re making behind the scenes. And, you know, you get a real sense, you know, of what they’re like, for example, if you’re paying 10 grand for someone to speak, and they’re booked out three months in advance, you realise that you know, they’re, they’re doing pretty well. So I was behind the scenes seeing a lot of this. And all through the 2000s, right up to 2010. I spent a lot of time around what I would describe as kind of key people of influence these, these people that go and get up on stage. Or I saw them mostly getting up on stage, but they’re also in the media and writing books, and all that sort of stuff. So the thing that I kept seeing over and over and over again, was people thrusting business plans at them. And you have a percentage of my company, will you, you know, would you be a figurehead for my business? And I’ll give you 10% of the company, you know, can you speak at my conference, you know, I’ll happily pay the 10 grand, the 20 grand. And then I also saw that they were quite good friends with all the so-called competitors, like they weren’t, you know, what the marketplace might have viewed as competition. They’re all having dinner with each other every month and talking and discussing how they might, you know, work together and all those kind of things. So they’re all actually frenemies. No kind of joint venture partners. And I just, I just got this amazing experience seeing behind the scenes. And one thing that I remember thinking in the late 2000s was, how on earth would you compete with someone who has this kind of a brand. So if someone has that personal brand, if someone is that key person of influence, if they can pick up the phone and get through to anyone pretty much if they want to, or if they’ve constantly got inbound opportunities like they’re moving at such a different speed to the rest of us, that, that I just thought to myself, this, this is just a, you know, you interior a key person of influence until you move on the inner circle of your industry, your full-time job should be to become one because there’s not a lot comparatively, there’s not a lot of action happening outside of that top 5% of the industry. So I started writing blogs about it, I wrote a blog on a website called Academy, I ended up being the owner and the managing director Academy, I ended up buying the business. Yeah, I bought the business at one point. So I ended up at that point, I was a blogger on Academy, I later became the managing director of the academy and the owner. But I wrote a blog on Academy and basically said, said that you know, until your key person of influence, your full-time job is to become one. And it kind of blew up a bit and got thousands of hits and people commenting and kind of got good traction and people wanting to know more and what was my opinion on this. And essentially, I said that you’ve got to write a book, you’ve got to have a very clear pitch, you’ve got to have a product ecosystem behind you. So I started just unpacking that in the blog. Yeah. And because I’ve got such traction, I ended up writing the book and the book thing got traction, and actually quite hilarious. My strategy for becoming a key person of influence was to write a book called key person of influence. a very literal approach to moving to the inner circle.

John Ball  
But one of those four people want to know about but what point for you then did you actually feel like you had become a key person of influence?

Daniel Priestley  
Probably when I started getting paid to speak. I think the kind of Some of the breakthrough moments for me, I mean, I was, I was speaking my own events, obviously. But then there were times where people would start emailing and saying, hey, we’ve got a conference, and we’ll pay you, you know, silly money to come and speak at the conference. And it was like, wow, okay, and getting paid to speak around the world, and, you know, those kind of things. And also people coming up and asking for a signed copy of the book is pretty special. I can tell you, you know, that if you’ve got even, you know, anything less than being a Zen monk, and, and, you know, having your ego completely in check. But there’s something very nice when someone comes up and says, Hey, I love your book, could I get, could I get a signed copy, and it’s like, four, yes, that’s, you know, I always act cool. But on the inside, I’m like, really kind of glowing,

John Ball  
I can well imagine I can put myself in that position. And I would be pretty thrilled myself. And so that’s a great place to get to, but you kind of followed your own process and, and wrote about it and kind of became a key person of influence from doing that process. One of the things that you talk about in there that I think did actually really hit with me was about writing, writing a book. And I’ve had some professional speakers talk about this, as well as saying similar kind of philosophy, I think of that having a book is the best business card you could ever have. And you say something very much the same effect in your book.

Daniel Priestley  
Yeah, it’s the best business card. But one of the sayings that has kind of like a lot of people, like I say that the book that changes your life the most is not one you read, it’s one that you write. And there’s a lot of reasons for that. So one reason is that a book is amazing, I’d say it’s beyond a business card, actually, it’s far more than a business card. It’s almost like a salesperson, or a business development manager who’s out there meeting people, you know, whereas a business card might have your contact details, your book has your whole story, and it has your whole value proposition and has your whole, you know, typically will have case studies and stories and insights and data and research. And if people read the book, typically a good a well-written book, people put down the book, and they think gee, I’d love to do something with this person, you know, I recently actually read a book that I immediately got in touch with the author and books, five coaching sessions with them, and said, you know, I’d love to, I’d love to, I looked on the website, notice that they do coaching sessions and said, Yeah, great, I’d love to have to do some coaching sessions with you. So, you know, I just, I just thought, great, you know, this is, this is great, now this person is on the other side of the world, and they’re going to be doing some coaching with me around fitness, and, you know, sort of health and wellness and fitness and stuff. And it’s like, you know, that’s the power of a book, how would that, you know, prior to having a book, how would that person in Texas pick up a client in London, you know, who’s super pumped to talk. So, you know, I have a client call tonight, where someone’s booked metres to do a call with them a business chain of clinics in California. And I do that call at 8 pm to 10 pm tonight so that we’re on the right time zone for California. And we’re doing some work with their leadership team. You know, and how did that happen? Because of the book.

John Ball  
So it can’t just be any old book, right? You mean, there has to be something that’s giving value and that people are going to read it, they definitely want to work with that person. They know what they’re talking about.

Daniel Priestley  
Yeah, there’s, there’s a certain formula to writing a book you want to really convey, you know, you’ve got to be able to put your best foot forward, you’ve got to, I think text, the textbook style book doesn’t really have that wow factor, if it kind of looks like just a book that, you know, anyone could have compiled the research. And, you know, here’s the, here’s the stock standard answers, it’s got to have a little bit of a spin to things, it’s got to be your take on things your unique perspective, it needs to tell your story and share a little bit about you and what you’ve been through. And, you know, it has to have that little bit of spice in the book where it tells the reader who you are, and what you’ve achieved a lot of. Now, this brings up another issue. A lot of people say well, that’s all well and good if you’ve kept in a rugby team, or if you’ve, you know, floated your company for a billion dollars. But you know, what about for ordinary people. Now, I’ve been working with thousands of people over the last 10 years, many of whom have written books. And one thing that we’ve discovered is this concept called the mountain of value. And the mountain of value is if you imagine that you climb up to the top of a mountain and you’re standing on top of this huge mountain, you can actually see the entire horizon everything around you, but the one thing you can’t see is the mountain. And what I used to describe what I’m using, what I’m saying here is that when you’re standing on a mountain of value, which many of our listeners will be? To you, it seems pretty mundane. It seems pretty Boring. You know, it’s like, oh, you know, of course, I’ve done some award-winning projects, or I’ve done that interesting little thing or, or even I’ve had a failure, I’ve been punched in the face. And I had that real setback. And I had to recover from that. And actually, that could be incredibly valuable to a reader. It’s, you know, people don’t only want to read books by billionaires and sports stars, they want to actually read books by people who they can relate to. And, yeah, the, you know, the whole idea. The whole idea is that, you know, maybe I don’t want to read a book by an athlete, maybe I want to read a book by a father of four Who, who, who has to fit fitness in around having kids. And, you know, type thing.

John Ball  
It’s interesting because it’s reminded me of a conversation I had with a guy called Matthew Dicks, who is an award-winning storyteller and writes about storytelling, as well as being a successful non-successful fiction author as well. And he was saying similar kinds of things about telling stories, and that people, some people think they don’t have a story to tell. And it’s that sort of blind spot of our own lives as thinking that our experience is mundane and not going to be that interesting to anyone. But when you actually start to unpack it, yeah, there’s nearly always something there. But also that the most powerful stories aren’t always the most Wild Wild is things that have ever happened. And like there’s a guy I think, had a two sort of close, close to death experiences and survived them that aren’t necessarily the most interesting things that the most powerful stories are often the most just sat around the dinner table at home with the family and having a moment of realisation. And that makes it much more relatable to a wider audience who’s learning him. I can’t even relate, having been had been in a car crash and thrown through the window. But I can relate to sitting around the table with my family and having those kinds of conversations. Oh, yeah, so sorry, I think that’s a different context. But very similar,

Daniel Priestley  
very similar this year. Earlier this year, I read a brilliant book called The Surrender Experiment. And the book opens up with this guy saying, when I was 23 years old, the most incredible thing happened to me, which I was sitting there in the living room, having a conversation with a friend. And I noticed that I had an inner monologue, I noticed that I had a voice inside my head, commenting on everything that was being said. And once I noticed that I couldn’t stand it, I couldn’t stand this voice that just wouldn’t shut up about everything. And it’s, it’s funny, because the book then goes and talks about meditation practice, and it talks about, you know, being able to quieten the mind and all this sort of stuff. But it was hilarious because his big breakthrough moment, the moment, the big bang moment of the book is sitting in our living room having a conversation and noticing his inner monologue. It was not being thrown through the screen or anything. But it’s interesting, because it’s an incredibly captivating book, his particular book, and, and it’s a lot of ordinary experiences, but he unpacks them really well. I want to flip side on that. And the flip side is, I work with a client who is a Paralympic multi-world record holder gold medal, Paralympic athlete, phenomenal guy has a kind of blindness, and he’s also a cycling champion. So he does these tandem bikes bike riding. And when I talk to him about, you know, being at the Olympics, and you know, team, Team GB and being in Brazil, and being in China, and representing the country and all that sort of stuff, you know, he sort of says, Well, you know, it is just a bike race, and you know, what you do Daniel’s really interesting, but you know, what I do kind of, you know, it’s interesting for a few days, once every four years, but it’s really quite mundane, for most of that time. And it’s kind of hilarious in his mind, what he does is really kind of dull and tedious. With a few high points, and that I’m doing really interesting stuff. And I’m sitting there looking at him going, you know, it’s incredible what you do. And, you know, we kind of bring out the best in each other by kind of reflecting back and saying, Don’t devalue your story, you know, it’s, it’s amazing stuff.

John Ball  
Yeah. And it’s often what makes you more accessible to other people as well as what people want to get. But yeah, we’d have that tendency, like we tend to see things just from our perspective and think that other people know what we know or have more interesting lives than we do is. It’s very hard to see what’s not inside your head sometimes. 

Daniel Priestley  
Oh, yeah, completely.

John Ball  
Yeah. Coming back then to the key person of influence. One of the things that I focus on a lot in my podcast is about public speaking skills. In fact, my work is teaching and training public speaking skills as well. Everyone has their own journey to becoming a speaker. You started getting on the stage, when were you doing your events was that the first time you ever did any kind of public speaking and just like a bit bit more about your development because you’re someone who regularly does speaking events.

Daniel Priestley  
So at first, I was doing roadshow marketing and my business travel and events really focused on this roadshow concept. But it was all behind the scenes, it was all it was actually my job was filling rooms and filling rooms and coordinating the roadshow almost never. Well, I actually, that’s not true, what I did do is I would often introduce the first speaker, so I would, you know, Hi, I’m Daniel, I’m the founder of triumphant events. And, you know, we’ve, we’ve brought you here, and we’ve organised this event, you know, and our team is here, and our fire exits are here, and our lunch breaks will be at this time, and, and all of that now to our speaker. So I would often do that kind of just the basic MC kind of role. So I wasn’t unfamiliar of what it’s like to walk up on stage and see, you know, 200 faces looking up at you that, you know, I kind of got dipped in for five minutes at a time when we were doing that. So I kind of did slightly lose my fear of public speaking just by doing that, you know, on a semi-regular basis. But we were doing a roadshow in 2004 with the CEO of a franchise, and we booked Well, we ended up doing 174 events that year, 2000 14,005, it was like three a week, and for the year, it was in incredible, insane, nonstop roadshow that never ended for a year. And we got about three or four weeks in, and one of the downsides of what I was doing was I would hear the same presentation over and over and over and over. And it was just like, what, you know, I could do the damn thing in my sleep. Anyway, three, four weeks in, and I’ve heard this presentation, you know, I’ve now heard it 15 times, and I’ve got it, you know, well and truly in my head, and it’s a great presentation and to our presentation. Anyway, we’re running this event on the Gold Coast, and we’ve got 70 or 80 people at the lunchtime event, we’ve got 200 of the afternoon-evening event. And then we’ve got another event the following day in Brisbane, and then another day, the following event in the Sunshine Coast. And the guy the speaker comes in, and he’s not dressed for going on stage. He says, Daniel, I’m so sorry. My father has been taken the hospital with a heart condition. And I need to go to the hospital. And he said, Look, you know that you know the presentation. You’ve heard it plenty of times, can you just do this lunchtime one, maybe the evening one, and just take people through the slide deck, while I go to the hospital? Okay, you have a two-hour presentation. Okay, let’s go with it. So, I jump up on stage and I deliver, I just, you know, let people know the CEO has been had to go to the hospital, but I’ll be taking you through the presentation. And lo and behold, we get the exact same result. So the exact same number of people fill in the expression of interest form. And, you know, we get the conversion. And then I did it again that night, and we get the conversion again. And the CEO tweaked with this immediately. And he says, oh, Daniel, you’ve got the exact same result, I guess I don’t have to do the presentation anymore. And I went well, if you want to pay me a speaking fee, because bear in mind, I’ve done a lot of speaking fees and negotiated a lot of speaking fees in the years. As well, if you want to, if you want me to do it, I can, I can free up your time. So you don’t have to do this anymore. But you know, you’ll just need to add a speaking fee to the, to the mix. So he said well, it’s worth it. You know, if I don’t have to be there, I’ve got other things I can do. So happy to pay, you know, a speaking fee. So I negotiated myself a speaking fee, which I’d never kind of done before. And next thing you know, I’m delivering three or four presentations a week as a paid speaker, paid presenter. And, and that year I delivered 174. So it was 2000. And this happened in 2004. And then in 2005. We did 174 events, which I was the paid, which I was the speaker for. So it was a baptism of fire. And, and immediately I was thrust into speaking in front of audiences of regularly in front of audiences of 100 to 500 people.

John Ball  
Yeah, there’s nothing quite like being sort of pushed into a position where you really don’t have a lot of oxygen to sort of push yourself to actually go and go do and go for it and make it happen and think that that really worked out incredibly well.

Daniel Priestley  
Yeah, it was phenomenal. And it meant that we really controlled from my point of view, we control the whole process end to end and we can charge an enormous amount of money for what we did with clients. It gave me a view of how the whole business ran and meant we could control the whole business. And that was essentially the key from getting from going from a million a year to a million a month.

John Ball  
So, yeah, so in your speaking at some point, you made the transition then from someone else’s presentation to presenting your own materials when?

Daniel Priestley  
Yeah, well, kind of when I first came to London, I was presenting Roger Hamilton’s materials, wealth dynamics, and I actually ended up touring the world, speaking in dozens of countries about wealth dynamics, so I gave Roger’s presentation. So right up until that point, I just didn’t have the confidence that I had anything presentation worthy myself, I would learn someone else’s presentation and deliver, delivered on stage. And part of the value that we could offer to a, you know, the client was that we could literally free them up completely from a whole bunch of the work a whole bunch of what they wanted, what they were doing. And you know, so Roger had created wealth dynamics. And I literally flew around the world, presenting wealth dynamics all over the world, and also in the UK. So it was this kind of, you know, that was my next major speaking experience, being a global speaker presenting someone else’s work.

John Ball  
And that was where I first encountered you at an event, I think was Earls Court Exhibition Centre or something like that.

Daniel Priestley  
Yeah, yeah. It could have been that. Yeah, it was. Was that I think, was it myself? Or was it Roger?

John Ball  
Well, both. I already had met Roger. Before that. So I think maybe I’d been to another event before that. But that was the event where I first actually first remember meeting you. So? Yeah, so.

Daniel Priestley  
So that was at that particular time, I didn’t have any content myself just purely parroting someone else’s content. But, but building confidence as a speaker.

John Ball  
Yeah. Which is that which is super important, and a really good thing to have. And I got offered a training position with a company some years ago and had the choice of no it could have gone down that path didn’t look very steady at the time. But I wanted to do my own thing. I wanted to say what I wanted to say and ended up not going down the route where I could see the benefits of it from as you’re saying, like getting into that habit and being conditioned to speak into a larger room and being like a tribute band. You know, gay, a gigging, a gigging musician who’s is doing backup. Backup musician, versus someone who’s writing the songs and performing their own songs. Yeah, yeah. What for that in terms of whether it’s as a speaker or anyone in public, like what makes somebody a key person or influence over them having their own book.

Daniel Priestley  
So in the book, I talk about five things. The first one is a pitch. So it’s one thing to give a great inspiring talk. But the world of that has kind of moved on, there was the zig Ziegler’s of the world and Bob prompters of the world who literally just turned up, their product was just talking and giving a canned talk. And they would have their, they’d have their canned 2-hour keynote. And they turned up and they gave this motivational talk. And you know that very much kind of they got to the height of that model. Most key people of influence have a very clear idea as to what they’re pitching. So they’re actually they’re using the stage as a way of leveraging and pitching some sort of big idea. So think Elon Musk launching the cybertruck. You know, think Steve Jobs or Tim Cook, launching a piece of technology from stage. So it’s like this, the first question is, what are you kind of going to what are you going to be up on stage pitching? What idea? Are you pitching? What is it you want people to go and do? What movement Do you want to create as a result of you being on stage? Because it, I mean, even if you are a motivational speaker, let’s say the best of the best are the ones who can pitch people to do something that they weren’t going to do. Prior to hearing you speak, you know, that the true measure of a great speaker is they move you to some sort of action that you weren’t going to take an hour earlier. So perhaps they inspire your own health and fitness, maybe they spot inspire you to take your relationship to a different level. You know, whatever it is, but they’re there. You know, a brilliant speaker pitches you an idea that makes you do something different than you weren’t gonna do an hour ago. That’s, that’s great that essentially is the greatest speaking. You know, if people sort of go Oh, that was entertaining, that was nice. It’s great, good showmanship, but it’s, it’s not that kind of influencer. So the first One is pitching. The next one is publishing. So we already talked about the book. The book is also a bit of I will say this, it’s a bit of a filter as an event. Booker, as an event organiser, someone who’s a conference organiser, I don’t know why, but there’s just this ingrained thing about booking speakers who have a book. And I don’t know why that is, like this common filter, but try and think of any of the major speakers who don’t have a book. Like, it’s, it’s really rare.

John Ball  
They haven’t written it themselves.

Daniel Priestley  
Yeah, like, it’s, it’s quite rare that the super professional speakers that are right, you know, all the time up on the stage, even the TED talk, you know, Ted talkers, and all that sort of stuff. They’re published, in some ways in if they’re academics, they’ve written a thesis or a dissertation. Sometimes they’re New York Times columnist, but more often than not, they’ve got a book, like, I’d say something like 90% of the TED talkers have got books written

John Ball  
If not then, definitely afterwards.

Daniel Priestley  
Yeah, exactly. After the million views a month is, yeah. So it’s a bit of a filter. The third one is a product ecosystem. So one of the things that keep people in influence have is a way of making money that is not leveraging their time, so that they can set foot on stage, they can give a great presentation. And then something if people want to buy something, it’s, it’s anything but their time. Because as soon as you’re into the job of selling purely and simply your time for money, and especially in a linear way, where one client is one unit of additional work, you know, and that 10 clients is 10 units of work and 100 clients is 100 units of work, you know, sometimes you might be selling your time, but it’s leveraged. So 100 clients is no different to working with 10 clients. So, so they typically they have product, so that they can make money through other ways other than just speaking fees. I will say that the age of speaking fees is a little bit complex now, but…

John Ball  
It is, yes. 

Daniel Priestley  
Yeah, there’s very few speakers who can genuinely just say, I’m five grand to give a talk. Like that’s, that’s it, and my full value is you pay me for a keynote and, and then I give a keynote, and then that’s it. Like, there’s very few people, you know, normally it’s exporting legends or, you know, actor, you know, like, some top academic or something like that. There’s very, very few of them. But the ones who make the most money are the ones who actually can afford to speak for free, if they want to, because they know that the wheels will go spinning in the background. You know, so Elon Musk doesn’t charge a speaking fee, he turns up, and he’s he sells $10 billion worth of cyber trucks. Yeah. So product profile, I define profile very simply as you are who Google says you are. So if I google you, and a bunch of really good stuff comes up, and I can see you’ve got a tribe and a following. And you’ve got good things on page one, two and three of Google. That tends to be Yeah, okay, this is a good person I want on stage, what you do not want, if you’re an event organiser, you don’t want anyone who’s got any controversy around them. You don’t want to you don’t want a speaker who you Google them. And you know, there is some sort of fight raging around them. There’s haters, and there’s people who are polarised around them. You want a nice, smooth event. And you just want a good, clean, good quality profile. So that when your people are thinking about buying a ticket to the event, they Google the speakers, it’s like, oh, yeah, these look, these look like great speakers, I’m looking forward to the event. So profile is about having a nice, it doesn’t mean you’ve got a million followers on Instagram or let your New York Times, you know columnist or something like that. It’s just that if I google you, it’s full of really good stuff. reaffirming who you are. And then partnership is the ability to bring more to the table, not just yourself, the ability to bring in partners, the ability to have relationships that form strategic joint ventures, product partnerships, brand partnerships, all of that sort of stuff really makes you a key person of influence. So those are the five P’s pitch published product profile partnership. And when you have those five P’s in place, you very rapidly kind of moved to that inner circle of the industry.

John Ball  
Yeah, and do all of the five pieces need to be there.

Daniel Priestley  
They tend to multiply against each other. So as with any multiplication, if any of if any multiplication series is zero, it kind of zeros off everything else. So you might have some that are stronger and weaker than others, but it tends to be that, you know, if you’ve got a weakness and you bring it up, it multiplies against the whole rest of you know the weakness. So for example, there’s this guy called Jay Shetty, who has 50 million followers on you know, he’s a friend of mine. I actually knew him when he was just starting out, which was kind of cool. I used to meet him in Euston station, like back before he was famous. And but he today he’s got like 50 million followers on social media is got 7 million Instagram followers, he’s, he’s got all that. But he’s only just putting his book out at the moment. So his book goes live this week. And you know, he hadn’t published that book. But watch what will happen, what will happen is that hundreds of thousands of people are going to buy that book. They’re going to read that book, and it’s going to galvanise who he is to them. So they have a superficial relationship with Him currently looking at his Instagram feed. But as soon as they read that book, suddenly they go, Oh, wow, I’m loyal to this guy, I want to know more about him, I’ll, I won’t just turn up if he’s in town, or pay to turn up if he’s in town. Because I’ve read the book. So what I’m expecting to see is in the year ahead, he will actually go write up a whole other level as he gets 100,000 true fans.

John Ball  
What was the hardest part about writing your first book for you?

Daniel Priestley  
The writing is just hard. Writing is, writing’s hard. It’s terrible. It’s just, it’s, it’s hours and hours and hours and hours of work. That punches you in the face of like, oh, that doesn’t look very good. And that’s pretty shit. And you haven’t really thought you thought you knew a thing or two about that. Now we’re 500 words in and you’ve said everything that you think you know about that, you know, in that particular chapter. So it’s, it’s hard, and it’s, um, it’s hard, and it’s challenging, and you get no rewards. 99% done pays no dividends, you know, you get no points for effort in the writing. So you might spend a year writing something, and then you publish it. And actually, the rewards typically come six to 12 months after you publish. So the hardest point is, is that it is a project of delayed gratification, really, really delayed gratification. And you get no points right up until the end.

John Ball  
publishes. Even writers are often saying writing a book isn’t generally going to make you rich.

Daniel Priestley  
From Yeah, yeah. So yeah, exactly. So it’s you, you really have to understand where it fits in your business. So for example, I believe that the older model was authors trying to sell books, and the new model books trying to sell authors. So do you know the reason so the top-secret behind the scenes? expos a secret of me is that I actually gave away thousands of books. So when I had even when I first had a book out, I didn’t even try and sell the damn thing. I printed thousands of them. And I just gave thousands of them away. Because in my mind, if you know how I actually thought about it. I thought about it, that each book is a cup of coffee. So I would think to myself, and this happened to me, because one of my speakers who I ended up spending hundreds of thousands of dollars with, I had bumped into him at a conference, he knew I was the conference organiser. And he said, Daniel, I would love for you to consider me as a speaker at your events. Can I send you some books? And I said, Yeah, sure. And he sent me this beautiful package with all these books that he had written. He had written 10 books, and he sent me the whole, the whole bundle wrapped up, and handwritten card and everything. And I actually skimmed through his books. And I ended up booking him for hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of work over the coming years. And I remember he just kicked the relationship off with a free book. He sent me through the book. And I remember thinking to myself, if I was like, john, if I met you at Homehouse, right, a member’s club in London, and I said, Oh, John, I’d love to buy you a coffee. Of course, I would. And of course, I would happily buy a coffee and it would be £3.50 plus my time and all that sort of stuff. There’s not even a question that I would happily sit down by your coffee and talk through what I’m up to. But how do you leverage that right? If you meet four people a day, that’s only 1000 people a year. So then I thought to myself, well, actually a book is like a cup of coffee. Anyone that I if there’s anyone in the world that I would happily sit down and have a cup of coffee with and buy them a cup of coffee and chat. I’m gonna send them a book. So So in the first year, I think I sent out maybe two or 3000 books. And, and it was like, it’s like for me it was this opportunity to have two or 3000 cups of coffee without taking any of my time.

John Ball  
You got you’ve got to be impressed. I think anyone who says that right. And even the most times I hate you But when you have a copy of my book, and I think that’s always impressive even if you only had a part in my team, the book, it’s, it’s still impressive because most of us aren’t published and most people don’t have their, their own books out there or the names that were known. So it’s really important. Yeah. Is there anyone you think that the key person of influence strategy wouldn’t work for?

Daniel Priestley  
Umm… I mean, we have worked with 50 different industries, plus, we’ve worked with 3000 clients. We’ve worked with vets, academics, sporting stars, we’ve worked with celebrities we’ve worked with who already had a following. We’ve worked with IT computer people, AI, you know, AI people, we’ve worked with leading doctors and dentists. So you know, you, I’m kind of at the point now, where, you know, it’s just, it’s just a good best practice across the industry, to position yourself as a key person of influence. Can you think of anyone?

John Ball  
No, not really, I think it could work with pretty much anyone in any industry, apart from anyone who doesn’t really want to be known.

Daniel Priestley  
Yeah, look, if Yeah, look, the only one is if there was some, if there were serious skeletons in your closet, and you, you absolutely know that you’re going to get exposed for that fraud that you ran, you know that that pyramid scheme, that Ponzi scheme that you… kind of, you know, and maybe if you’re making money, if you’re making money, hand over fist, with some extreme niche, actually, here’s a good answer. Other than the Ponzi scheme, a person who’s got big skeletons in their closet, if you were genuinely making money, hand over fist with a particular niche that you do not want people to know about. And you want to stay extremely quiet and not attract any competition, occasionally that happens. And of course, if that’s the situation, you just want to shut up and be very quiet and, and have a Honda that you drive to work and a Porsche for the weekend. But yeah, so I have come across a few people who have actually said to me, Daniel, I want to be anything but a key person of influence, I want to keep quiet because what I’m doing is working extremely well. And I don’t really want to signal to the market, that they should come and compete.

John Ball  
One of the things, that’s a great answer, and I can say that works as well. But one of the things that I often say to people, because I’ve worked in the world of presentation skills, and public speaking, is that we are now in an age where we are in the AI revolution. And it’s already happening, it’s already going on. So many of the roles and jobs that exist today will, over time, as is already happening, be replaced by algorithms or by robots. And so you know, I mean, Andrés Oppenheimer in his book, The robots are coming, he says that the two areas that are definitely protected and still growing at the moment, are education, and entertainment. And, you know, if you’ve got something that kind of crosses those two as well, and then you’re in a winner, and I think that’s why that’s one of the things that makes public speaking or even being an author, very relevant right now, as I if you want to stay relevant in the business world, you have to become more well known, you have to be informing, and to some degree, entertaining people not making them laugh, but, you know, educating in some way to really stay relevant and still have something that’s worth knowing about. Because over time, who knows what’s gonna come in terms of new businesses and new jobs? And for at least for now, we know that education and entertainment are still growth industries.

Daniel Priestley  
Yes, yes. And no. Look, behind me is a painting that was created by a robot. And it’s a humanoid robot that is programmed with an algorithm from Oxford University to emulate creativity and to come up with new things on its own. And it’s called ADA. Ada the robot and basically so anyone listening, if they want to Google and see what’s behind me then, you know, it’s a robot is the artist. Um, here’s the issue with education and entertainment. One great educator and one great entertainer can now look after a billion people pretty easily. You know this is a problem that we’re moving into if you think about 100 years ago, had Alicia Keys been a singer 100 years ago, she would have been in a piano bar in New York, playing to audiences of 50 people at a time. And there’s absolutely no possible way in hell, that she could have been simultaneously playing to an audience in London and an audience in Sydney and an audience in Singapore. Even though she’s got a cracking good voice, she could only play to 50 people at a time. Today, if you’ve got a voice, like Alicia Keys, you can play to a billion people a day, you know, millions of people a day, all over the world, on their timescale whenever they want, wherever they want. So you actually don’t need all that many amazing, talented musicians. A few hundred musicians can keep the whole world entertained. problem is that what we’re seeing is, is a phenomenal science teacher will actually be creating lessons on YouTube, that hundreds of thousands of students will be loving their take on how to do it and all that sort of stuff. You’ve got to be surfing this wave, you’ve got to be ahead of the curve, there’s we’re going to see a polarised society going forward, where essentially, there’s going to be more haves and have nots, like less of a blend of that middle class doing well, despite not being terribly special. You’re actually going to see the middle class in the Western world competing with people in Turkey and the Philippines and Indonesia. And you know, Pakistan, and India, all of those kinds of places that have lots of young, talented, educated people who are quite happy for 75 US dollars a day to be doing a professional, white-collar kind of job. So you’re gonna have a lot of people competing for that. You know, more than ever,

John Ball  
For some reason, you make me think of The Incredibles, like if everyone has superpowers then no one’s special.

Daniel Priestley  
Totally! Yeah, yeah, this is the thing. I mean, I personally think that the kind of lost industries is going to be hairdressing. You know, at what point will we let a robot cut our hair?

John Ball  
But I’ve seen these machines in Singapore, I think was the last place I saw them these robot hairdressers. 

Daniel Priestley  
Yeah, yeah, I’m sure that they’ll create it. I’m not sure I’d let a humanoid robot near me with some scissors.

John Ball  
I’ve watched Space Odyssey too many times, I don’t trust them.

Daniel Priestley  
Yeah. Yeah, exactly. But the real trick at the moment is, imagine it like this. Imagine in the 2010s. Here’s a visual, imagine that there are these railway tracks that have been put down. And there are these incredible railway tracks going out to the world. But if you want to, you can stick something on those railway tracks, and they’ll just go straight down to Africa, straight down to Australia, off to New Zealand. And someone’s gone and spent the money and the time to lay down those tracks, where whatever you want to get out to the world, there is now this base infrastructure to do it. And you’re either going to leverage that or you’re not going to leverage that. And essentially, when you’re doing something that’s small and localised and non-digital, and, you know, realistically, your business model can serve a limited number of people in a limited number of locations, you’re essentially not leveraging those railway tracks. But as soon as you say, Okay, I’m gonna have a product that can go anywhere in the world, I’m gonna have a book that can go anywhere in the world, I’m going to create content that can go anywhere in the world, I’m gonna release videos and podcasts and all that sort of stuff, you might not be the most famous person in the world, right? You might not be Justin Bieber or something like that. But even if you end up with 3000, people who absolutely adore what you do, and happy to subscribe to something, you’re actually going to be pretty bulletproof. You know, with it with a global following of people who quite like you, and quite like what you’re doing, provided you’re leveraging those railway tracks. But as soon as you say, Look, I’m stuck, you know, I only do it in Manchester. And I only, you know, I’m a local model, I only do it in person. I don’t release any of my stuff online. Or, you know, are productive I produce a product or service and I build websites for people. That’s it. It’s like, okay, unfortunately, those railway tracks go both ways. And that person who’s in Turkey, a person who’s in the Philippines, they’re going to be happily shipping work from there to here at a fraction of the price.

John Ball  
So the best time to think about becoming a key person of influence would be right now.

Daniel Priestley  
Well, the best time was in 2009. The second best time is right now.

John Ball  
Yeah, that that makes a lot of sense. As always, the sooner the better. But yeah, I appreciate what you’re saying that that market conditions are going to change and a lot of people are going to be moving in the same sort of direction. I mean, Similar thing happened to me when I started in coaching, I got to a point where the recession was hitting and suddenly all sorts of people were calling themselves coaches, he had no right. No right to be calling themselves coaches. And this is like the market got swamped and took a while for all that chocolate to come out. For all too clear. And not everyone survived the purge if you like, but…

Daniel Priestley  
yeah, then the industry kind of come down again, when people realise actually not anyone can be okay, not everyone can be successful. It’s not such a commoditized thing that there’s a vast difference in, in quality. Yeah.

John Ball  
Other than unethical practices that you mentioned before. What are the things that people are perhaps getting wrong sometimes in, in creating or becoming key people of influence that you may see?

Daniel Priestley  
So there’s, there’s what are called functional behaviour or functional tasks, and there are vital tasks. So the definition of the word functionality is along the lines of performing a task, being able to repeat the task, you know, having a functional working knowledge of what you do, if you’re a photographer, you know, it’s functionally knowing what f stops are and apertures and shutter speeds and you know, how to light a room and the rule of thirds, and all that sort of stuff. So that’s the functional skill set of being a photographer. The word vital has two meanings, which is lifeforce. So if something’s full of vitality, it’s got lifeforce, and also, you’re replaceable. If something’s vital, you can’t really replace it, it’s, you can’t do without it, that vital organ. So, so there’s this set of skills, which is the irreplaceable life force skills, and all of school, your entire life has been about accumulating functional skills. And what actually pays the bills at a certain point is not more functionality. It’s more vitality. So the people who have the ability to become the irreplaceable lifeforce of something. Those are the ones who actually make a tonne of money, and the functional people organise themselves around those people. So what people do wrong is they focus on more functionality. And then it’s kind of like, Oh, well, I’ll get a master’s in finance, and I’ll get an MBA, and I’ll, I’ll do that work myself. And I’ll, you know, I’m a really great dentist. So well, I’ll do the dentistry myself. And I’m really great web developer. So I’ll do the web developing myself. And like, I’ll just do all the things. I mean, even if you run it to the full extent, you know, there are people like there are people who do jobs that you could outsource for 10 pounds an hour, 15 pounds now. So, you know, I’ve seen, I’ve actually seen entrepreneurs who build themselves out at 800 pounds a day, spending a day doing their own accounting and bookkeeping. And they spend time, you know, responding to endless emails, and they spend time doing their own social media. And I sit there and I go, you know, you could have a Social Media Manager on hundred pounds a week, you could have a bookkeeper on hundred pounds a week, you could have, you know, you could literally have three or four people on 100 pounds a week, and free yourself up completely of all that stuff. And you probably actually have the net effect, not just of having more days to sell, but you probably end up increasing your day rate from 800 to 1200. Because you’re now just that little bit more energised than everyone else. You know, and sometimes you look at these people who, who make a lot of money and you think what is it that they do? Like? Well, you know, what, why are they so getting so much paid so much different? What they do is they bring people together, they the thing doesn’t happen without them, you know, you might sit there and say, you know, is, you know, is this particular DJ, let’s say fat boy, slim is fat boy slim, so much better than every other DJ, you know, is that he is he has functional skills that other DJs don’t have. It’s like no, but he’s fat boy, slim, he if he’s there, 10,000 people are gonna show up. He’s got the name, he’s got the brand. He’s got the reputation. He’s got the connections there. He’s got the partnerships he can pull together, if you book him behind the scenes, he can pull together a whole bunch of people, he can have a lot of people who promote the event because he’s gonna be there. So it’s the actual non-functional stuff that really makes the money, not the functional DJing skills. It’s the intangible stuff that we’ve never been trained to, at school about. So the concept of vitality is so foreign to us. If you’ve come through school and university, this idea that there’s this entire different set of school skills that have nothing to do with functionality is like a weird concept.

That’s what people do wrong. The number one thing they do wrong, and here’s some practical stuff. Stop cleaning your damn house and get a cleaner. Like, you know, get a cleaner, and but pay the cleaner for four or five hours a week to come in and do the cleaning. And while they’re there, while they’re in your house, use that as a trigger to sit down and write up your case studies, write an amazing blog that you’re going to share on LinkedIn. Figure out what your method is, in your model is take that amazing piece of work that you didn’t interrupt for an award. And you know, while the cleaner is cleaning your house, you are going to use that time to do something of high value that will set you up in the future. And that simple concept of outsourcing something functional, while you focus on something vital that bring some life force into the business. That is that concept, you can blow that right up to the size of Microsoft. And you get the same sort of idea. But the kernel of the idea is hard CCleaner and do and write a blog while they’re there. That idea is what most people should be doing if you and here’s the thing if you think you know it, but you don’t have a cleaner. And if you think you know it, and you still respond to your own emails. And if you think you know it, and you still do your own bookkeeping, you don’t get no

John Ball  
Good advice. Good advice indeed. I have one question more about but I have to ask about the key person of influence, about your book, that about the underlying theme. And maybe you get asked this quite often?

Daniel Priestley  
But it did tells me that people have actually read the book.

John Ball  
Okay. Well, I’m still a little uncertain whether it’s just a very clever device to get people to reread the book, or whether there is actually an underlying theme in the book.

Daniel Priestley  
So, there’s no underlying theme in the book, what I’m referring to when I talked about the underlying thing. And for anyone who’s not read the book, I opened the book with the introduction. And I finished the introduction by saying, by the way, there’s an underlying theme that you should pay attention to. And if you figure out this underlying theme, you’re going to get a burst of energy, you’re going to get super creative, and you sit up all night won’t feel tired. And you’ll just flow with ideas and information and inspiration. If you notice the underlying theme, if you don’t notice the underlying theme, a lot of what will be in this book will be fairly pedestrian. And it kind of makes people go what like what, what kind of weird wizardry Are you hinting at here, Daniel. So here’s the thing, there’s no underlying theme in the book. The idea behind the underlying theme is that it’s in your life. So there’s a theme of there’s something there’s a kernel of something that happened in your origin story, pre age 10, or pre age 15 is something else, that there’s a, there’s a moment of empowerment that happened under before 20. There’s a moment of empowerment that happened between 20 and 25. And all of it clusters around a similar idea. For me, having a garage sale, when I was 10 years old, that first spark of entrepreneurial, something entrepreneurial, it was, it was actually sparked by a house fire, where everything was water damaged, or smoke damaged. And then I turned something negative into a positive through entrepreneurship. And there was something in that. And then there was another similar experience that was about the boy scout group that I was part of when we had to raise money to fix a problem with the scout Hall. And then it kind of there was this theme of problems happening, like problems that were negative, and everyone was upset about. And then an entrepreneurial solution came in to solve the problem. And for me, personally, when I discovered that my thing is entrepreneurial solutions to big problems and that the world’s biggest problems could be solved with the entrepreneurial mindset and entrepreneurial solutions. And then I kind of put language around that, which is I develop entrepreneurs to stand out, scale-up and make a dent in the universe. And I created a company around this idea of entrepreneurs solving meaningful problems. And the whole like, vibe of why we called the company dent is Steve Jobs saying if you’re going to be an entrepreneur, why not try and make a dent in the universe, you know, do something meaningful. So for me, it was about discovering that this theme that goes right back to kind of age 10 at least, is running which is entrepreneurship, solving meaningful problems. And when I got that when I went, oh, wow, my origin storylines up with my mission lines up with my vision. Then it’s like this alignment, energetic alignment and, and from energetic alignment, you know when you’re energetically aligned because you have a burst of creativity. So you suddenly feel like the stars align, do you feel like your body’s aligned, you feel like your mind and your body has kind of like, tingle into the same space. And then you go Whoo, and suddenly 8000 words come out, and you go, wow, I’m just in the zone. So what I tried doing what I wanted to spark as an idea with that underlying theme is just purely and simply go looking in your own story, see if you can identify the theme because it’s that story that’s going to be the key to unlocking the real value you’ve got to offer.

John Ball  
It’s great to have an answer to that question. And one I can very much relate to as well. It’s been kicking around my head for a few years now.

Daniel Priestley  
Hopefully, it’s a satisfying answer.

John Ball  
Oh, yes. Oh, very much.

Daniel Priestley  
So as opposed to the underlying theme is 37. Number 37, appears 37 times.

John Ball  
Well, I would take it away and ruminate on it still, but other than your own books. Is there a book that you would always recommend people to read?

Daniel Priestley  
Well, getting back to what we were saying before, other than my books, the book that changes your life the most is is the book you write not the book you read. So I’m always, people say what other books would you recommend, and I keep saying, there comes a point where you’ve got to stop reading and start writing, you’ve got to stop consuming and start creating, you get paid for what you create, and you get nothing for he can see him, I met this amazing book reviewer. And she has a whole like, you know, she reads a book a week. And she’s like, super into like, you know, she’s got a whole method about how she reviews books, and how she, you know, kind of skims the book first. And then she delves deep. And then she writes a review, and then she reads reviews again. And it turns out, she’s read dozens, if not 100, plus business books, and hasn’t actually done anything with it. And I’m sitting there going if reading books changed your life, she would definitely be a candidate for being a billionaire. You know, because she’s really geeking out on reading books. But I know people who have written a book, it’s done really, really well. It’s changed the change their life, and they don’t read all that much. They’re just out there doing it. So you know, the big message are no… Look there. Of course, there are great books I could recommend. But I just want to slap people in the face and say, Enough reading time to write a book if you’ve not written a book. Or even if you’ve not written your second book, enough reading time to write the book that changes your life the most is not one you read, it’s going to be one that you write.

John Ball  
That’s probably a great place to wrap things up. And today when I do finish my first full book, I’ll be sending you a copy. I hope you might read it. So thank you so much for giving up your time today and coming and sharing so much great value and information. And it’s been a real pleasure and a privilege to chat with you. I really appreciate it.

Daniel Priestley  
My pleasure. Thanks so much for having me on the show.

John Ball  
Thanks for tuning in. I hope you’ve enjoyed the show. It really was good to get an answer to that question about the hidden meaning in the book Key Person of Influence that’s been bugging me for the longest time. I hope you enjoyed the show. Please make sure you subscribe and like and leave a comment as well. YouTube likes that kind of thing. It’s been really great having you come and listen if you think you’d make a great guest for the show or you know someone who would please get in touch john@presentinfluence.com is my email address. You can also find me on matchmaker FM and on LinkedIn. So come and connect with me like we know who would be good to have on the show. If you’re enjoying the show. We can make any improvements back next week with more amazing guests continuing things like the series in humour in presentations, storytelling and much, much more. See you again for another speaking of influence very soon.

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