Who Run The World? With guest Joanna Martin founder of One of Many™

I am truly privileged to have Dr Joanna Martin as my guest on my podcast. Jo was my trainer when I first learned neuro-linguistic programming and she was also one of the people who taught me presentation and public speaking skills. Since she is the person who inspired me to want to become a speaker and trainer, it was a delight when she agreed to come on the show.
Jo is a renowned visionary, coach, speaker and entrepreneur Her message and work have directly impacted over 120,000 people on four different continents. She initially qualified as a medical doctor and spent a number of months in oncology where the death of a favourite patient provided a wakeup call to get her life “on purpose”. Then, she changed her career and was accepted to the Actors Centre Australia.
She went on to study human psychology, behaviour and growth and in 2003 launched her own coaching company in Sydney, with no network and no business experience.  Within a year her business was thriving, consulting with the likes of ANZ bank, John Fairfax Publishing and eBay.
From there she worked as Head of Research and Training at one of the fastest-growing personal development companies on the international stage and in 2008 launched her own business Shift Speaker Training, which she took to 7-figures within just 12 months. There she shared her speaking success secrets with over 23,000 business owners over four years.
Her evolution continued in 2014 when she founded One of many, to help women to step up into leadership and increase their impact without burning out. One of many has so far reached over 70,000 women around the world. Jo is an internationally acclaimed and award-winning speaker, a diplomatic wife, a sometimes-too-tired mother, a protective sister, and a caring friend.
Don’t miss this fascinating and inspiring conversation and find out how Jo is just one of many women changing the world.
For anyone who gets/got a bit lost when we talked about values systems, it was referring to Gravsian Values as defined by Clare Graves in Spiral Dynamics. A very worthwhile and surprisingly accessible book. The book Jo spoke about in relation to this is called Reinventing Organisations by Frederic Laloux.
Jo’s FREE gift to you is Seven Rituals to Calm the Daily Chaos: https://oneofmany.co.uk/rituals/
Here are some ways you can connect with Joanna Martin on social media:
Facebook – business page: https://www.facebook.com/OneOfManyWomen/
LinkedIn – business page: https://www.linkedin.com/company/one-of-many/
LinkedIn – profile: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joannamartin/
Instagram – business page: https://www.instagram.com/oneofmanywomen/
Instagram – profile: https://www.instagram.com/drjoannamartin/

Hope you enjoy the show. If you listen on Apple Podcasts, please leave us a review. It helps people to find the show and helps me to keep improving.

Have a great week, John.

Transcript

John Ball
Welcome to speaking of influence with John Ball from present influence.com. Each week we talk about presentation skills and public speaking and the tools of influence and persuasion with experts and incredible guests. Stay tuned and enjoy the show. Speaking of influence is uploaded and distributed to all major podcast networks through buzzsprout. Buzzsprout is the simplest way to get your podcast started with tons of great resources for new podcasters. You could start your podcast today, follow the link in the show notes. I’m really really happy today to help me get through I’ve wanted to bring on the show for quite a long time and I wanted to wait until things were a bit more running with the show before I did. And one of the main reasons for this is because this is the person who I would say inspired me the most want to become a speaker and to do some presenting as a trainer and get up on the stage. I don’t think it would have happened without her inspiration. I’m very happy to introduce this person to you because she’s an amazing businesswoman. She’s an amazing speaker, and still a massive inspiration to me, and to many people I know, and to particularly now to women all over the world with what she’s doing and her work now. So, please welcome to the show, Joanna Martin.

Joanna Martin
Thank you so much, john. I’m so looking forward to today.

John Ball
I’m really glad to have you here. And you know, we’ve had a bit of a chat before we did our recording about things well, but we’ve known each other for quite some time. I think 2007 was probably the year I first met you so it’s been a while

Joanna Martin
Don’t, it makes me feel way too old.

John Ball
But it’s been really lovely as someone who has learned so much from you to see even your development since that time as well. And I know that like presenting and speaking and running a business was not your first port of call as a career, you’ve ended up on a very different path altogether.

Joanna Martin
Yes, absolutely. I started my working life actually, as a medical doctor. I think when a little eight-year-old girl announces to her to pharmacist parents that she wants to be a doctor when she’s grown up, it is met with a lot of encouragement and a lot of positive reinforcement. They were pushed me into it, but I suddenly ended up there and a lot of that was unconscious. And whilst I was a very good doctor, and everyone loved me, I was great with patients and so forth. It didn’t really feel like my kind of calling, you know, it didn’t feel like my kind of difference to be making in the world. So alongside that at school and into university, I’d always done a lot of acting. And I had that little What if question, you know, what if I wonder if I could ever make a career with that? What if I was an actor? What if I was a director? And so after my intern year of medicine, I auditioned for drama school and I got into a great drama school. It is the same drama school that Hugh Jackman kicked off and Nicole Kidman, there have been some very good people there. And it was an amazing, amazing time because finally, I was doing something that felt much more aligned with who I was. But oddly enough, whilst I was there was when I had my first introduction to the arena that I now work in, and that is in coaching and training. And as soon as I saw, I saw a speaker up on stage, you know, weaving stories and telling tales and teaching tools that people could use to change their life. For me, that was it. It was the great marriage of the helping and the performing aspects of myself, I guess. I think maybe if I bought have been born in a different culture would have made a great shaman, you know?

John Ball
Quite possibly, but you know, you were certainly one of those people for me, and when someone is there like it was the first training was learning, neuro-linguistic programming from you, which maybe perhaps has, it’s been a long time since you’ve taught that now.

Joanna Martin
Well, I think like every great toolkit that you learn as a coach or a speaker, you learn it consciously you practice with it consciously and then ultimately it moves into your unconscious and becomes a part of, you know, the great toolkit. You know, I don’t think any of us that have been doing it for a great number of years or even decades now. You know, have one thing that is the key and critical piece, but yeah, absolutely. When I first started learning about life coaching, the toolkit that I first learned was, was NLP and I still say to anybody who is serious about becoming a fabulous trainer that it is a great toolkit to have, I don’t these days. Like if you if you’d asked me back then I would have said it was the one that was the only I mean, I didn’t have anything to compare it to right. But since then, I’ve done a lot more further development, a lot more research a lot more of my own evolution and crafted things for myself, because I couldn’t find anything. And it’s certainly one of many things that I use still.

John Ball
Yeah, I mean, you made the transition from that from essentially that was like a time when you were working for another organisation to working for yourself and actually doing that as, as someone who is training and teaching tools or presentation skills, what was it that inspired that decision for you?

Joanna Martin
I was harangued by clients. Basically, I first launched my very own coaching business as a little solopreneur back back back in the early days, and that grew up to about you know, I was doing about 60 K a year with that I did it for about 18 months before then, my trainer who had trained me and everything approached me to become his head of research and training for his organisation and to help him grow. So I took that contract and it was fabulous. You know, it was absolutely brilliant. The opportunity to on somebody else’s platform was probably the fastest-growing company on the international stage at that time. You know, we were travelling to loads of different countries which was fabulous. So many, so many awesome opportunities, and I guess to be able to hone my skills with a fast-growing company and something I highly recommend to new speakers now if that opportunity Does, does come their way, but it was I nearly burned out, I nearly burned out is what happened. You know, I remember my 30th birthday was probably the first day when I was Skyping. Back to my family in my boyfriend at the time is now my husband Greg. And I was exhausted, I was absolutely exhausted. So while on the outside, it was a very glamorous lifestyle. You know, here I was nearly burned out by 30. It clearly wasn’t working for my body and system. So not long after that I resigned from that organisation and ended that contract. And talk. It was my husband who actually gave me some really good advice. He said, You know, you shouldn’t make a decision for four months, he said, every single company in this space is going to have been watching what you did over the last three years for the organisation that I was working with. And they’re going to want to, they’re going to want you to have you as part of their team. So if it’s a great opportunity to still be there in four months time, don’t make any decisions for four months. And sure enough, within like a month of the word getting out I was people were offering to give me half of their business to come and do what I did like it was huge time and it was so hard not to make any choices. But I needed to rest. the best advice I’ve ever had was that advice from Greg, four months turned into nine months, but during that window of time, the other thing that was a constant was all of the people who’d been in audiences with me at that time. You know, that’s where, where we first met John. Were reaching out to me and saying, Jo, could you please teach me the business of speaking? You know, they’d seen, I guess the impacts that I’d had in Chris’s organisation. they’d heard my expertise and my business wisdom, I guess and what I learned on the inside of a big organisation like that, and they wanted to know, you know, can you teach the business of speaking how to sell from the platform, how to how to run a speaking business? And I think eventually, you know, a couple of friends who were also have always been kind of like mentors to me and Greg as well. Eventually, they just kind of, you know, twisted our arm and we thought far out all right, we’ll do it. So I’ve got to say that first step into our own business with me and Greg was not necessarily one of God, this brilliant thing that I want to do in the world. Don’t get me wrong, it was always aligned with my purpose. Helping people that wanted to make the world betta was very much what my purpose was about. It was just kind of one aspect of that but it was just demand. That’s what people wanted. And what they wanted from me at that time. So it’s what we did.

John Ball
Yeah, well, I wasn’t at all unhappy when you came back on the scene where we do speaker presentation training, because I can come to one of your events and had the best time learn so much. And one thing I’ll say with you, particularly as a speaker, I still remember some of your stories from that event from some of the training that I’ve done with you. And consider I consider myself very lucky to have had that time when I first my first ever speaker trainer, you were there as one of the lead trainers and it was an incredible experience. I can remember good words of advice that you gave me on my first day, I had just flown in from Los Angeles on a night flight, and it comes straight to the training from work like jet lag, not much sleep. And I said you’re not sure maybe I should go mutagen it’s nighttime. He said note your absolute perfect, just go and do it and let your unconscious take over it. Probably better than everyone who’s well-rested. And I think you’re probably right.

Joanna Martin
Yeah, yeah, I think we lose our conscious resistance when we get exhausted. And indeed, to this day, I still designed training that were people out at the conscious level, you know, early on so that we do open up unconsciously, not in quite the same way as you know, a Robins would like sleep when you’re dead. That’s not my philosophy. I trained women these days and we need our sleep or we need rest. But I think there is something to be said for, for well-crafted training that allows our conscious mind to get out of the way so that we can just really soak in the learnings and get it deeply embedded as quickly as possible.

John Ball
Right, so so let’s talk about what you’ve moved into now then as the next step in your business evolution, which is now to working with women, particularly around leadership, and very much needed. But again, what prompted that for you?

Joanna Martin
Well, I was getting more and more messages from my own unconscious if you like on my soul, I don’t know how you want to say that. But, Greg, it started because Greg and I had been trying to conceive, we’ve been trying to have our first son, James, for a number of years. And, and it wasn’t happening. And I was just getting all of these hunches and clues and you know, in my writing and in my physio, very much my physiology as well, that I needed to take a break from the speaker training, a break from a business break for speaker training, I wasn’t really sure what it was so, so we did kind of one final round of training To that end, and then within and I’m not even kidding. Within a week, was it two weeks, maybe two weeks of completing our final speaker training event. Greg and I had moved back to the UK signed a lease on a place completed that training within two weeks we were pregnant with James it was just so clear that my system wanted a break. You know, so that was the first piece. However, I’m always so grateful for what that business provided for us and for so many people got so much from what we shared and taught during that period. And it was then whilst I was there was must be good 10 months later, I was breastfeeding James. And I just had this big insight, you know, there are moments when you just see through to the truth of it, whatever it is. And it just became really I was reflecting on that. The quote, which gets bandied around a lot in personal development spheres for women, especially from the Dalai Lama saying that the world will be saved by the western woman, which is quite controversial really because quite frankly, I don’t think it is just Western women. I think what he was trying to get out at the Vancouver peace summit in 2009. Because, you know, his for me to tell the Dalai Lama, what he was actually trying to get at But I think I think a more valid point that, that he’s burying itself to be true is that the world will be changed and shaped by women who have access to resources. And the reason that I think that is critical is that we women and not exclusively women, right? It’s not exclusively women. But, but what we women do when we are in positions of leadership, is we bring with us generations upon generations of compassion and caring, which has been bred into us, you know, up until 50 to 100 years ago, we weren’t allowed to be anything other than caring, nurturing and compassionate. Do you know that was the one power centre that we were allowed, we weren’t allowed any of the other spaces because of the way that the system was set up the very masculine paradigm that we live in and in leadership right now? Well, there is so much research, which is showing that the sorts of qualities that are required in leadership today are systematically being demonstrated more by women leaders than by my latest, you know, yeah. So I got this at this time when I was I was there we’ve James in his darkroom breastfeeding, it would be all of a sudden, I realised that he wasn’t talking about just prime ministers and presidents and global corporation CEOs. He’s talking about me, and he’s talking about my sister, and my neighbour and my mom and my grandma. You know, he’s talking about women with access to resources and all those of us with privilege those of us with more privileged than others, it’s our role I think and responsibility to actually harness our own energy and juggle and balance our own lives. Make that impact and the reason as I looked around at all of these people, this is who needs to step up here. It’s not waiting for someone else out there. If some leader on hire to come and make the world better, it’s us we’ve got to do it. But as I looked around at, you know, my sister and my grandma and my aunt and my neighbour and everybody else, everyone was just tearing around like headless chickens trying to make ends meet, trying to juggle the child care with who’s buying the Christmas presents and trying to be a good person and maybe doing a bit of fundraising for some charity on the side. It was just like Bedlam in most women’s lives. And I thought to myself that that’s it that’s what I can do. Do you know if I’ve gotten really good at anything over the years it’s what I call fierce prioritisation fiercely aligned to my purpose to my values giving energy to those things which feel like they’re my soul’s contribution to make on the planet and nothing else and ability to say no, I’m very good at saying no Wasn’t a wise I haven’t always been, but I’m very, very good at saying no. And to those things which don’t feel great and aligned, and I thought, God if I can, if I can, if I can create a space where women can come in and, and get that Do you know, to be able to handle the juggle of their day to day life to be able to step up and have a greater impact, whether it’s leading their family, their community, their organisation or their country, and increase their impact without burning out that that’s what I want to do. And so that’s how one of many was born.

John Ball
And the name is very appropriate, then based on exactly how you’ve explained how it came about and how you understand it.

Joanna Martin
Exactly. You know, I truly believe that is there’s nothing special about me, you know, really, I remember trying to explain this to a very American masculine paradigm mentor at one point, and she couldn’t even conceive that it wasn’t that I wasn’t the guru. I’m like, No, no, no, really. I’m not the guru. I think Things that I, these things that I can teach and that we do. I haven’t nailed it, none of us nails it and to the extent, they’re out there touting the fact that everybody’s got this now than if you haven’t, there’s something wrong with you. And you know, that’s the whole point. That’s what we need to move away from. A more recent mentor of mine wrote a fabulous manifesto recently called we the unfinished and I love that. Do you know, I think for all of us, all of us is imperfect. All of us is unfinished. All of us wish we were better than we were or wish we could do more than we are. But we’re the ones who have to make that contribution. We’re the ones who have to just keep growing as fast as we can. And I am just one of many women who are going to contribute to the world. I’m one of many women who has organisations like this you know, there are multiple but we what we’ve created, I think beautifully. And this is where you know, you’re truly aligned with purpose, because it’s well beyond what I ever could have conceived of in my little brain. But what has come to pass with one of many is an extremely Ordinary community we’ve had, I don’t know about 60 or 70,000 women come through our grants gate, some stay some head off. And in that space now we have a beautiful ecosystem of women who are consistently standing next to each other, being a fierce, committed stand for one another’s best selves, you know, encouraging each other to step up when it’s time to step back when it’s time to rest when it’s time to go hard when it’s time. And it’s, it’s extraordinary. And, you know, we’ve now got, we’ve now got nearly I don’t know, it must be close to 250 certified coaches. We’ve got 30-year-old certified trainers who are now taking our tools out as well. So it’s some it’s grown faster than I could ever have conceived. And I think it’s because just that deep soul level I’ve heard most clearly what my beingness was ready for, you know, just like this is it. Just Feel like one of many is actually like an entity separate to me. And my job is just to listen really carefully to what she wants, and do it. If I keep doing that we do great.

John Ball
I love it. And I think for me, like, female leadership is such a needed thing to begin training and giving more I’ve been seeing more women stepping up and stepping into their power and achieving so much more is more like, hopefully, getting closer to balancing the scales a bit more so that we can have that paradigm shift. And I think in recent times, we’ve seen that it has been female leadership in the political world, perhaps that has been really stepping up above most of everything else we see in the world and as exceptional leadership, I’d say

Joanna Martin
has been some really exceptional leadership through this global crisis, you know, that we’ve been present to it’s been absolutely extraordinary. I mean, Jacinda Ardem, my pinup woman of the type of leadership that we talked about, and it’s really Interesting from a drone because even three or four years ago, there weren’t in the media, visible examples of the type of leadership that we talked about. There were women in leadership, but most of the women who are very visible in leadership were still operating in the masculine paradigm. Do you know they were still operating from a very competitive and individualistic kind of approach to things, whereas Jacinda and, and indeed, many of the many, many, many of the leaders of the Nordic states, now Iceland and Norway, some exceptional examples of what we would call soft power leadership at play, women who are not coming from that place in a very collaborative, compassionate, strong, have gravitas and can make the big decisions, and frankly, are willing to step in and make the tough decisions, the unpopular decisions, which, you know, which I know, which I know is more difficult when When we’re in that kind of profane, masculine energy and for men and women alike, you know, it doesn’t, I think it is, it’s not a gender thing, it’s more of an energy thing, if we’re in our masculine energy, when, when any one of us can be a man or a woman can be masculine energy, and we have that competitive streak where we need to win or at least avoid failing, then, you know, it becomes this popularity contest or the or the how do we be the best? Or how do we do the whatever? Whereas if we can be in that feminine energy when it’s actually much more about community and collaboration and connection, if we can make decisions of what’s best for the greatest good and the great, you know, for the whole, and move away from this fiercely individualistic pursuit of rights that I think is happening in so many countries. I think that’s actually one of the key things that are made, made the navigation through this really difficult, you know, health, political-economic time, you know, is that ability to go this isn’t going to be popular, but this is actually what is required for the greatest safety and, you know, and preservation of, of society as much as we can, you know?

John Ball
Yeah, it’s, I mean, it’s my hope that that kind of leadership is going to steer us away from the muzzle, or authoritarian and aggressive styles that we generally tend to see this whole definition of power being tied in with really what I would call sociopathic qualities is something that needs to be broken.

Joanna Martin
Exactly. The system is broken, right the system is well, I so saw some articles saying the system’s not broken. It’s working perfectly for the power plays involved, but I think what has happened, and we’ve seen it, we’ve seen the fracturing of it. We’ve seen people calling it to account you know, through so many of the different movements that have come out I mean, it was starting to happen with the climate change movement. And look at Gretta at you know, we have a tiny little small child leading the charge on climate change. Do you know I just think it’s extraordinary. And that I think opened us up then we’ve obviously we’ve had Coronavirus, and we’ve seen amazing responses from New Zealand, Taiwan, Nordic States, Germany, all led by women not so great in countries that are led by our authoritarian you know, blokes when I guess it all depends on what do you say is great, but I would say death toll, you know, that for me is pretty much up there.

John Ball
I tie this in really with something that I think I first encountered from you and certainly from Chris, who you were working with at that time, the spiral dynamics is the values levels like this is a shift in values levels from I guess, we’re talking about level five values.

Joanna Martin
I think that’s it, I think I think a lot of nations are still very values level five oriented you know, certainly the UK UK still got a lot of four it to frankly, hasn’t it but the states is all about five, you know, Australia’s where I come from, there’s a lot of five, there’s some more six there. I think the problem that we see is that I’m not sure that many nations are going to be very happy to go through the values level six as a, as a centre, where it’s all about, you know, decision making by consensus that’s never going to work for a country. But what we see you did, right, I think it’s nice to have this chat with you, because no one else I’ve been able to talk to about that. But yes, what we see I think, with so many of these, especially female leaders is values level seven style leadership. You know, it’s it’s effective. It’s systemic, it’s, it’s, there’s a great book actually, I don’t know if you’ve read if you read Frederick Lou’s book reinventing, reorganise reinventing organisations.

John Ball
I haven’t but…

Joanna Martin
You would love it. It’s a great read on he calls it teal, right? Same thing, values levels is what he’s talking about to organisations. And I think that style of leadership is what we need right now. It’s got enough of the embedded community and, and holistic kind of approach, but it’s still very focused on systems that working and getting the right outcome and, and allowing leadership beyond one’s self, you know, like it can be leadership for different, you know, whoever’s the right person for the job can lead on that particular plate piece. I think that’s what we’ve seen. What’s working really well at the moment right now is that kind of leadership. You’re right.

John Ball
And that’s the kind of values that you’re working on bringing more into reality into real-life experience. Yeah?

Joanna Martin
Yeah. Yeah. And in fact, just helped me to realise exactly what we started off in the conversation, which is these things become embedded in us and our unconscious but yes, that’s very much about what one of many is about where supporting women to be able to I guess have that In a values evolution to be able to be effective to step up and be the best leader at the front, if that’s right for them to be able to hand over when it’s necessary to hand over to be able to work with them through others for the greater good of all, that’s exactly what we’re doing.

John Ball
Which is fantastic. I love that you’re doing that. I mean, I, I hope that the work that I do, and certainly a lot of stuff in podcast I do includes a lot of female empowerment because it’s something that does matter to me. But I know that as a guy even as a gay guy, it’s like it’s not really an area I can work in it really does need to be women who were teaching that and leading the way for each other with that, but certainly it can be my role to support that and to to help progress that as well.

Joanna Martin
I think that’s it we all need to be allies. Right. I think that right now this is a time where those of us with more privilege need to ally with those with less you know, whether that be around gender, whether it be around race, whether it be around sexuality, you know, whether it be any of these different kinds of issues which are so fiercely coming to the fore at the moment as they should. It’s the job of all of us, I think, to make each other’s voices heard in the right, you know, in the correct way. And that’s why it’s so beautiful to be able to chat about this stuff with you, John, I think it’s critical.

John Ball
I think it’s always important to do that you have a very clear vision. What would you like to see like in terms of maybe more like, legacy? What would you really like to see come from one of many?

Joanna Martin
Do you know, I didn’t know. When I envisage the future. I’m out five or seven generations. Hence, you know, that’s the vision I’m working towards. I don’t know how much of it’s going to happen in my lifetime, and I’m okay with that. For me, when I look at my vision there, I see parity in leadership. I see just as many women in justice Same leadership roles as I see men and everyone on is working together. There’s nobody doing, you know, 80 hour weeks anymore it’s a thing of the past where we’re far more collaborative and recognising you know skill strength so that it doesn’t disclude having children and you know, all of that kind of stuff. So so I really do believe I was on Necker Island last year with the virgin unite foundation and Jean Oelwang, who’s the president of virgin unite, which is Branson’s Family Foundation. She gave a great presentation, she said, I think the time for silver bullet type thinking is long gone. But there are certain silver levers that we can pull. And for me, I think striving towards parity and leadership politically at an organisational level at community level, and even just in the domestic level at farm, right if we can achieve partnership power partnership within couples and parity of representation across those spheres. I truly believe that that’s the silver lever. Because if you open the doors in order to achieve parity, we have to change the systems because women are opting out at the moment because they think it’s either the 80 hour week and no babies right? Or the 80 hour week and babies but my kids won’t know me. And so that will fuck it. I’m not going to do it. Right. I’m sorry. I hope we can swear on this point.

John Ball
Yeah, yeah, absolutely.

Joanna Martin
I’ve done pretty well to get this far in actually…

John Ball
No, I highly encourage it.

Joanna Martin
So I think so that’s for me, the vision that I have is parachute because of all of the systemic changes we would need to have implemented in order for parity to be able to be there. That is what’s going to make the world better. Not that it is not that we achieve parity, but it’s the things we would have had to have changed. About how we relate to each other about how things about equity, you know, equity at home equity in organisation in cross politics, it for us to see the results of parity, so much would have had to have changed and that’s what I want to. That’s what I want to, I don’t know sow the seeds for, you know, I don’t. And I think if one of many were right at the beginning of seeing the kind of female leaders that I think can help us there, and if one of many we’re a breeding ground for visible female leaders, that will start to be those role models for the next generation. So it becomes normalised that you can be a great mom and a very busy visible leader, you can be a great mom and also do these other things or not be a mom and that’s okay, too. You know, like, just having the full menu on you know, being able to select from the whole menu as a woman and be able to make the impact that feels like it’s called to in your heart If that could be what we show to our next generation, if we can impact you know, I’ve got a vision to equip a million women with these tools to be able to sustainably change their corner of the world. And that’s kind of where my first milestone is, I mean to that end.

John Ball
Which is a fantastic goal.  And I truly admire everything you’re doing here. I think it’s wonderful. Thank you. Do you think recent times that with Corona and all of this, which was you shouldn’t mention the podcast, but what the heck do you think that maybe might be something that’s exacerbated change and may be made people realise in this big wake up. We’ve had this huge pattern interrupt into our life experience.

Joanna Martin
Hugely. Absolutely. I think I think this global pandemic has been… I truly don’t think we can even conceive of how society is going to look after this. Right? I really don’t think we can. I think this is a possibility point where a bifurcation point where we can go to, you know, a new way of being or it’s going to get way messier than it was and to be honest, I think the jury’s still out on which way that’s gonna go. But yes, at a very individual level we saw women in our community, having powerful conversations with their partners for the very first time about partnership on the domestic stuff, you know, they’ve just been putting up with it. But when you’re both at home, both homeschooling both were trying to work full time. You can’t ignore the fact that you’re the one doing all the fucking laundry and everything else. You know, we’ve seen women having conversations with their bosses where it was this one moment where I’m one of our great one of our members in our lead to change programme, which is a year-long leadership programme came to one of the causes and she was just like, everyone I should have said something, but I didn’t. This is what just happened. She’d been on a call with her boss, who was a man who had said to her, Well, you’ll need to take this because unfortunately, we’ll call him James, your co-worker is at home, you know, caring for the kids at the moment because of the pandemic, blah, blah, blah, you know, working from home, multitasking, childcare, and our lead to change. Woman in question at the time was like, Oh, yeah, of course. Then she got off the comment. Like me too like, I’ve got my kids here too. But just because I’m better at it because I’ve been doing it for 20 years. I didn’t speak up. And so she was like, she went back and she spoke up and she said, this is not okay. This is the pointy end of the gender imbalance thing. It didn’t even enter your consciousness that I’ve got kids at home, just because I’m better at keeping them out of the space. He’s hopeless at it because he’s never had to do it before doesn’t mean that it’s okay for me to have to do more. And so we’ve had lots of those conversations with bosses. We’ve had lots of lots of women in very personal ways, recognising the inequity around them and starting to champion themselves and champion that space. We actually put the qualities, the equalities office, the woman equalities office was looking for evidence on the unequal impact of COVID-19 on protected communities of which gender is one but race, you know, a whole bunch of different things. And we surveyed our entire community got some incredible information of what was actually going on at this time for women. And there is absolutely no doubt that women have been hit harder even though you know, oh, men do worse with Coronavirus. Okay. Yeah, maybe you do. But everything else about it, the economic impact, the mental health impact, you know, the relationship. Everything else has been just so stressful. You think about women at home who are now over here who had been suffering, abuse at home then got locked up with their abusers. You know, it was just messy. So I think it is, I think, absolutely it’s one of these moments and we’ve seen it in Black Lives Matters. We’ve seen it in trans Lives Matter, you know, all of these sorts of movements coming out saying no more, you know, no more. This is not okay. Yeah. And I think and we’re economically things are going to change dramatically. Right, absolutely, dramatically. I think we are still very much shielded from what is going to happen. And I truly do believe that it is in the way that we recreate from this and that we demand better from our leaders. You know, leadership is not just about being out there and being a visible leader leadership is also about demanding more from our politicians, demanding more from our places of employment, demanding more for what it is that we require, right? They’re in our home in our partnerships, you know. And I think, I hope, I truly, I know the opportunity is there for this and I deeply, deeply hope that we can equip and empower ourselves all of us men and women alike to advocate for the better as we come out from this.

John Ball
One of the things that I think would be great to touch on is really how you go about doing that now talk about the vision is inspiring, but how then do people go about empowering themselves to actually step up as the leaders in their lives? And then you’re focusing that specifically on women at the moment, but I know it’s relevant to anyone who might be listening to actually make yourself a person of influence a person who’s listened to

Joanna Martin
his I think, yeah, I’m gonna answer this differently, perhaps, and I may have answered it before but just what I’m most present to from our conversation at the moment and that Is that I think there are a few key pieces. If you want to be a person of influence, if you want to be someone who’s listened to, you’ve got to have something worth saying. And the only thing worth listening to is what moves your soul. You know, I think for so many of us, we can get so tied up in the marketing of our business and the packaging of our messaging and the, you know, the creation of products and all of the rest of it. But the more I move in this space, and the more extraordinary people I’m blessed to meet, you know, I’ve had incredible conversations with leaders, you know, leaders of countries, gang leaders, you know, ex-gang leaders, like extraordinary people that I’ve met in the last few years especially. And it’s not about clever language patterns and you know, how to package things and how does, it’s who that person is, right? It’s how It is who they are being and what’s happened in their life that that makes them that you can’t not listen to them. Even if they’re just talking about you know whether or not we should go sailing on the OB cat or whether we should go do this thing. You just can’t not listen to them. So what is it that has someone be that have that gravitas? You know, I think there are a few things that go into that. The first thing is self-awareness. there I’m yet to meet a great compelling influence influential person who doesn’t understand themselves, right that doesn’t have so and they’ve all the ones I’ve spoken to on different practices of how to get to that self-awareness. But that might be a journaling practice. It might be a meditation practice, but there is some way they know what they’re great at. They know what they’re not great at, but here’s the most critical pace. They know what sets them on fire, because at some level, either through happenstance, or like something’s happened to them, like a significant emotional event if you like, or because they’ve made it their journey to discover it, they know why their soul chose to be on the planet at this time, right? They might not be able to answer it exactly that way. But the way they speak, they’ve just got that resonance, I suppose about themselves in their whole being, you know, I’m thinking of like, last year, I had the great privilege to meet Juan Manuel Santos, who’s a Nobel Peace Prize winner. He was the president of Colombia at the time who negotiated the peace treaty with the FARC guerrillas. It wouldn’t matter what that man was saying, right? You are listening. It’s not that he was, you know, I was he was one of the guys on Necker Island, you know, so where he’s hanging out and boardshorts and, and we’re literally literally Just banging around. And equally the Prime Minister of former prime minister of Bhutan, I also met there a called Lokko. L O double K T O highly worth following call on social media, he former gang leader who totally transformed his life and started going into former gang territories, you know, with his hands up in the air saying, I’m sorry, I love you like, you know, building these bridges across you know, keep feuding gang territories, each one of these people. And hello, Thomas Dakota, who ran for president of Iceland and, and ran the only financial institution in Iceland not to go bankrupt when the whole country did, for instance, these extraordinary people when they speak you listen and why do you listen? You listen because they care deeply and passionately about what it is That sets them on fire, they know where their skills are, and they know where they need to bring counsel where they need to bring others. But I think at the core of it, it’s this.

It just can’t stop. You just, they just deeply care about why they here, whether they’re clear about whether they speak to that exactly or not. And I see that in the women inside of my community. I have a slightly different take on leadership than a lot of leadership training organisations out there, in that I believe, if you just strip away everything that is not the authentic self, authentic self,  his soul’s purpose, and you just start speaking it, yes, you can go get some public speaking, you know, public speaking training after the fact. Yes, you can shape your messaging that more and do I when I put together a presentation, follow all of my rules, and you know, all of that kind of thing. Yeah, absolutely. I do. But I think that’s shaping. It’s like, you know, it’s shaping the rosebush. You know, the rose is beautiful, the roses individual it is unique, it would be beautiful. If it was scrambling all over the place you couldn’t ignore the beauty of the Rose, but you can take care of it and prune it and let go of the pieces that are not necessary for the exquisiteness. But the Rose has got to be the rose. So I think if, if if you want to truly influence people, the journey is an inward one. It’s like who are you? Why are you here? And what are you being called to do? You know? I mean a lot of people talk about legacy and they talk about what do you want to leave I it’s like um, I kind of not even thinking really about what I’m going to leave I just think that where do we need to go and what’s my role in that? How do I be of service to where I see that we can go and I think if we can if you can fall in love whatever is calling you forward and be of service to it deeply and passionately, Holy moly, that’s the best thing about life. Right. Why would you want to do anything else

John Ball
where there’s passion, you will find a way?

Joanna Martin
Yeah, yeah. Yeah,

John Ball
Exactly. Exactly. So it’s interesting. I always think about, I tend to relate more to thinking about maybe artists like musicians and painters and performers. But it’s, it’s really not like precision or specific ability that makes people the best at what they do. It’s always the passion that pulls in people. That’s what people connect with. And I think that’s very much in alignment with what you’re saying here is that passion, and how important it is to find that you find the way through that’s what will attract people, people won’t care if your talk if your talk isn’t perfect. Or if you say things are one way around. If you have the passion there for what you’re doing and for your message. I think if you if you know who you are as well, this is one of the most no if there’s only one thing that people take away from listening to this today. I hope that’s it.

Joanna Martin
I think so. And for me, it’s, um, it’s, it’s, it’s almost sometimes I think passion gets bandied around as a word you need to be passionate. But for me, it is a much deeper, it’s almost deeper than passion. It’s like, and it’s not something that it’s sort of at a surface level. It’s something which is at that deep soul level. So for thinking passion, you know, and I used to talk about this, I think, you know, the Passion of Christ. There’s that deep religious kind of connotations to that aspect of it, it’s that it’s, it’s what is your What? Yeah, what have you really burn, you know, what has you really, that drives you so much, you couldn’t, you could no longer ignore it. You couldn’t possibly ignore it without actually denying your whole soul and your whole self that is that, that that depth, and, you know, my advice to anyone would be don’t stop until that it’s that deep Don’t judge yourself if it isn’t there yet. That’s okay. You know, it’s a lifelong journey to discover it, you know, I mean, I, I had a great life when I was coaching and training had a great life when I was teaching speaking, you know, but was I plugged into that depth of that, you know, soul expression that time? No, of course, it wasn’t. And I bet in another 10 years I’ll look back at this and go archaeology kid, you didn’t know a thing, you know? But I think if you make that your mission to just keep learning that next level about yourself, it’ll everything else pales into insignificance.

John Ball
Yeah. And that kind of leads me to think about one of the issues that comes up so often with so many of my private coaching clients, and even with my group coaching, I’d say that people are waiting to find that perfect thing before they even get started. And it just doesn’t work that way. I know some people do. Some people just know what it is. They know straightaway what fires them up, but most people I think don’t and aren’t even getting started or thinking What if I choose the wrong thing? Or what if it isn’t? It may turn sour, you think he’s not gonna do the right thing that will develop over time. But if you don’t get started that journey that evolution won’t even happen?

Joanna Martin
Absolutely, I truly believe that one cannot discover one’s life purpose or one’s calling in inertia. You just can’t. The only way that you can actually navigate. And actually, that makes me think I’d quite like to look up the etymology of that word. But you know, if you want to navigate, you have to be in motion. You know, you can’t, you can’t remember I used to use a, I used to use an analogy of this, like if your car is currently you know, parallel parked between two cars facing in the wrong direction. In order to turn the car around and get going the way you want. You’ve got to go into reverse, then you’ve got to go off at a 45-degree angle and you might have to do a whole lot of different things to get yourself pointed in the right direction. But until you stop moving, you can’t get pointed in the right direction. And I believe Often, I use them as another analogy of what I call the indecision roundabout. It’s like this roundabout outside Oxford that I run into a lot and it’s got so many exits. I get confused almost every time but you know, you’ve got your, if you’ve got your Sat Nav, and it’s all plugged in and says, okay, you’re going to take the third exit, so you’re driving into the you driving into the roundabouts, big one, you can’t see the whole way around. And then you come to an exit is that the second exit is at the third exit. So you skip it, then your next one, I’ll shut it was that was the one I was meant to leave on. So now you have to go around again. But you’re still not quite sure. And if you are going around and around and around on around about you know how your Sat Nav is always like two seconds behind like it’s recalculating two seconds behind. It’s just the same way in life. If we are trying to work out whether something is more on purpose or less on purpose if this is good for our business or bad for our business. It’s like we’re on a roundabout and our Sat Nav won’t ever catch up like the feedback until you play if until you do something. You don’t get the feedback. You don’t get the feedback. From your clients, you don’t get the feedback from your soul. You don’t get the feedback from God or source or whatever you know relate to in that path. You don’t get the feedback until you’re in action. So to get off the roundabout, you just got to pick an exit, any frickin exit doesn’t matter. But you get off the exit, then the satellites catch up, and then you like to hear, you know, take the next left or you’re here turn around when possible, right, like one or the other. But it’s not until you commit to something that you can get the feedback that tells you whether or not it was the right path. people that get so attached to making the right decision. I don’t think I’ve ever made the right decision. But I do believe I truly believe that your success in business and possibly even in life is in direct proportion to the velocity with which you make decisions.

John Ball
As our mutual friend Taki Moore says don’t aim for perfect, aim for done.

Joanna Martin
Yes, indeed.

John Ball
Yeah, that’s much more workable. Now. You use that a lot with my class. as well to many people in for, for getting it right rather than just doing it and then working on it from there and that is the best way getting process get stuff happening. I want to come back around quickly before start wrapping things up to something you mentioned earlier about burnout and overwhelm, particularly in recent times where and see especially with, as you said, especially with women, there’s been high increase in stress and I many people are feeling that and still feeling that level of overwhelm and maybe even moving towards burnout. I know for me, I’ve been with quarantines and stuff here, just throwing myself into work is my way of dealing with that. But also realising that not something I can do at that level for forever, has been great and I’ve made a lot of progress and it’s been good But even now sort of thing. Now sort of coming out of that and throwing myself into it and dealing with what’s going on again in the world. It’s kind of emotional sometimes and I know a lot of people have even much more to deal with and I do, what advice would you give, especially for women who are dealing with all these things at the moment and struggling to keep afloat with it?

Joanna Martin
Do you know this? This is this has been the most common question that I’ve had over the last, you know, well, I mean, it’s, it’s what launched our business was how to deal with overwhelm, we’ve got a great little resource called the overwhelm first aid kit for exactly that point, because this is the most critical thing that a lot of women have to face. Having said that, in the last, you know, in this kind of period of quarantine, and so on, it has reached overwhelming heights. Because we have not only are we juggling more tasks, and more emotions than ever before, and more decisions like even just the decision of Do I go to the supermarket today or do I try and stretch that out bearing in mind the fact that that’s another exposure, but let me make 183,000 decisions before breakfast during quarantine, whereas in the past that executive functioning we were just in our usual routine. So if you add the amount have extra decisions were making to the amount of extra emotion. We’re all carrying around recognising that emotion is contagious. Fear is contagious. Anger is contagious. We feel it from each other, and emotions have been high. And then add that to the multitasking that has been required by so many, especially parents. And not this is not mums exclusively parents, men and women. It’s been absolutely burdensome and incredibly difficult. So, so I there’s a few ways to approach it. Critically, you have to work some time into your day for what I call spaciousness. And what you do in that time is completely up to you. But something that gets you connected. So personally, I’ve got a journaling habit. I’ve been doing it now since I was 18 years old. I first learned about it in the artists way. It’s called morning pages. I write three pages every single day. During the lockdown, I wasn’t it got worse when I started again, surprise, surprise, things got better. My other critical habit is for calming the daily chaos is a walk in nature. I’m blessed to live in the Cotswolds where I can get out and walk in the fields. And, and I can get out and harness my five women’s power types as we talk about here, one of many during that so get that getting that spaciousness in and prioritising self-care now not I’m not about doing your frickin nails, I’m talking about at the kind of self-care that we have needed. The radical self-care that we’ve needed in this last period of time has been things like a lot of emotional what I call emotional hygiene, you know, we get filled up with fear or we get filled up with anger or full up with hurt because you know, whatever has been going on at home, we’ve got to get that out of our bodies. You know, we have to learn to process emotion and get it out. And that’s been the kind of self-care that I’ve been advocating so much for the women in our community during this period of time. So it’s having a habit that gets you that spaciousness and such way of dealing with the emotional build-up that is happening at a much faster pace than perhaps it was six months ago.

John Ball
Are these things that tie in with your seven rituals to come? Yes, it did. Because you very kindly have offered that as a free resource for our listeners and watchers. So we’ll have that in the show notes for everyone. And, and thank you for those. It’s amazing how the conversation actually naturally brought us to that. So there are so many things I was hoping to get to talk to you about today. But I can’t complain. The conversation has been absolutely fantastic. I didn’t go where I’ve expected, but it’s been inspirational and amazing. And so I really want to thank you for that. I know you’ve provided through your pa provided some of the ways for people to get in touch with you. But if someone’s listening, and we’ll say, I want to check out this person right now. What’s the best place for them to come and find out more about you?

Joanna Martin
Yeah, if they would. So there’s a couple of websites you can check out if it’s more about me join a mountaintop Calm has got info about me and how to work with me one on one if you want consulting or that kind of stuff, I still do a bit of consulting one on one. But predominantly, the work that I do is one of many. So that’s at one of many.co.uk. And right there, there are loads of amazing free resources. Perhaps you’re interested in becoming a coach for women or a trainer for women specifically and interested in the methodologies and the tools that we share. You can find lots of information on our website there about how to get involved in that, but it would be a joy to meet anyone from your community. John, I feel like we go way back and I’m sure that they would be fabulous to be able to work in partnership with

John Ball
Well, I certainly hope so. And I hope that many people come and come and check that out. And I know that I love following you on social media, you’re pretty active on Instagram and Facebook and you’re a great person to follow there as well. And I used to want Nick arriving I think in the accuracy and stuff you were posting whilst you were there and already called. And one thing I do is like to get to with my guests you’ve already given me Will you give me a pass But recommendation which I love and really appreciate but we did talk about a book that you would generally recommend to everybody to check out

Joanna Martin
yeah do you know i i i think that oh my god that and when you asked me there were just so many competing things jumping into my head all at the same time. And that led me to think you know what, the thing that has seen me through quarantine is just good novel after good novel after good novel Now I know that sounds ridiculous and it sounds like a cop-out but here’s what I mean. One of the reasons so many people were not coping with quarantine was because they ended up going to bed too late. And the most seductive thing to get you to bed other than the sexiest partner imaginable is a damn good read that we reach that time when we get so so hit up in reading, you know, nonfiction or good you know, good books and a whole bunch of different things. I was gonna talk about Chip and Dan Heath and hold this, so many great books. But if I look back at the books that have held me held my head above water over the last six months, it’s been having a lovely, amazing, compelling story that seduces me to beds to read for those 10 minutes before I go to sleep. So my book recommendation is to go buy yourself a fucking good novel.

John Ball
I love it. I’ve been listening. I like audiobooks. And I’ve been listening to the testaments by Margaret Atwood. And that’s been phenomenal and the fact that different actresses are reading it and I and our two plays Lydia in the TV shows, I just worship, she’s reading it as well, like I could listen to her forever. So yeah, I agree. It’s like having these things. I really look forward to it. And I’ve always been a big nonfiction reader, but I absolutely love getting myself into a bit of fiction and being in that world in my head for a while that just takes me away and puts different perspectives on and yeah,

Joanna Martin
I love it. I’ve been reading, I’ve been reading a lot of fantasy fiction by black writers recently, I just recently read the book of Phoenix. I’m reading a book called The fifth season at the moment. And it’s wonderful. I think in the light of the Black Lives Matter campaign, we’re kind of taking it upon myself to get myself educated around anti-racism and so forth. For me, being able to see things through fiction through you know, through a different set of eyes is another really, really compelling and stimulating approach for me because there’s only so much you know, that we can take in at any one time in, in our, all of our nonfiction reading, but for me, it feels it’s the genre that I love, absolutely love kind of fantasy stuff and historical fiction, weirdly enough, so either kind of mash-up in my head, but yeah, there are some beautiful books.

John Ball
Absolutely. I know we need to wrap things up and you’ve got many other things to do. But there are so many other things. I wanted to talk about Banu is going to be an amazing show, I hope maybe sometime in the future, we can give it another go. And we can get to some of the stuff around more speaking and stories and things like that. And another time maybe. But for now, are there and you share so many amazing things. It’s been really an inspirational call and I’ve loved every minute of it. If there was just a closing message or a sum up that you’d like to leave everyone with,

Joanna Martin
I think I just say look after yourself. Do you know, I think most of us have had a tough time of that recently, we’ve tended to put everybody else’s needs ahead of our own. We’ve worried what everybody else is thinking about all about choices. It’s a really critical time to come back to centre ask yourself what’s important to you? And are you giving yourself the time that you need to be able to sustainably show up and build your business or make your impact or do whatever it is that you’re doing in the world? Take care of yourself.

John Ball
Fantastic. Thank you so much for today. It’s been really wonderful. I know that all keep following And keep checking out all the amazing things that you’re doing online. You are a wonderful person to be connected with and still a massive inspiration. So to me personally into many, many other people as well. So thank you.

Joanna Martin
Thank you, john. It’s been a real pleasure chatting.

John Ball
Thanks for tuning in. I hope you enjoyed the show. Remember to like and subscribe so you don’t miss any future episodes of the show. Like our next episode with LinkedIn content marketing expert, Angela Dunz. I had a lot of fun chatting to Angela, she was delightful and she knows her stuff when it comes to LinkedIn. If you have any kind of presence on LinkedIn, if you want to know how to use that really well as a marketing tool, you will want to make sure that you tune in for that conversation. Do keep an eye out for the humour and presentation series that I’m doing as well pointing at leading with laughter. A few of those episodes are already out there available in the back catalogue. You can find them in the playlist for this channel. And do also take a look at some of the other episodes in there as well. If you haven’t tuned in to the channel before, there’s a lot of great content haven’t been previously released. If you’d like to learn more about the show or get in touch with me, please email me john at present influenced.com if you think you’d be a great guest or you want to meet a guest on your show or speak at your event, anything like that, I’d love to hear from you. See you next time.

(Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)